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DVD Test: You only want me

You only want me

France: 2021
Original title : –
Directed by: Claire Simon
Screenplay: Claire Simon
Actors: Swann Arlaud, Emmanuelle Devos, Christophe Paou
Publisher: Blaq Out
Duration: 1h35
Genre: Drama
Cinema release date: February 9, 2022
DVD release date: June 7, 2022

Companion of Marguerite Duras for two years, Yann Andréa feels the need to speak: his passionate relationship with the writer no longer leaves him any freedom, he must put into words what enchants and tortures him. He asks a journalist friend to interview him to see more clearly. He will describe, with lucidity and sincerity, the complexity of his story, their love and the injunctions to which he is subject, those that women have endured for millennia…

The film

[3,5/5]

“Claire Simon is a director who likes to go from documentary to fiction and vice versa. Of course, sometimes he doesn’t really choose and direct films which, depending on how you look at them, can be perceived as fiction or as documentaries. This was the case, for example, in 2008, with God’s Offices, film recounting the daily life of a family planning center with counselors played by well-known actresses, women and young girls coming to consult who were not professional actresses and dialogues reproducing to the word the real dialogues heard during interviews taking place in Family Planning centres. The approach followed by Claire Simon in You only want me is quite similar to that followed in God’s Offices : she chose to bring to the screen the interview that Yann Andréa, companion of Marguerite Duras, had over two days, in October 1982, at her request, with the journalist and woman of letters Michèle Manceaux. This interview recorded on K7 could have remained in the dustbin of history if Pascale Lemée, the sister of Yann Lemée, renamed Yann Andréa by Marguerite Duras, had not found these K7 after the death of Duras and Andréa. Since then, this interview has given birth to a book, “I would like to talk about Duras”published by poor in 2016 and which has just been reissued, and here it is in the cinema, interpreted by an actor and an actress. (…)

Claire Simon chose to put these interviews into images in the form of sequence shots. At the start, the camera goes from one to the other, going back and forth between the one who tells the story to the one who listens, before lingering longer on the characters, almost frontally, the character of the one who listening becoming more and more important. We thus guess that, for Claire Simon, it is clear that, in such an interview, the person who listens, but who sometimes restarts the interview, is as important as the one who narrates. What Yann says is very intimate, going so far as to mention the sexual part of his relationship with Duras. You should know that Yann became a fan of Duras when he was homosexual, a state that Duras could not stand and that she chose to deconstruct. “I want to uncreate you to create you,” she told him.

In fact, one of the major interests of the film is to show us a man in a situation that many women have been in since the dawn of time: a man dominated and belittled by a woman and who admits it, a man in a state of submission and who admits it, a man led by a woman, in the 2 films he shot with her, of course, but especially in everyday life. If the interview represents the heart of the film, Claire Simon has been able to enrich it with a certain number of archive images and a certain number of erotic watercolors drawn by Judith Fraggi, allowing to evoke the sexual life of the two lovers. without resorting to cinematographic pornography.

Marguerite Duras, we never see her in the film, but Claire Simon makes us feel her presence with very small details. Indeed, these interviews took place on the first floor of the house in Neauphle-le-Château in which the Duras-Andréa couple lived while, at the same time, Duras was on the ground floor. To bring Yann Andréa and Michèle Manceaux to life on screen, Claire Simon called on Swann Arlaud and Emmanuelle Devos. One word is enough to describe their performance: prodigious! »

Excerpt from review by our columnist Jean-Jacques Corrio. Check it out by clicking this link!

The DVD

[4/5]

Extremely sharp and demanding film, having brought together just under 45,000 spectators in dark rooms (on 75 prints), You only want me was not intended for use in Blu-ray format, and it is no surprise that it can only be found in DVD format under the colors of Blaq Out. However, the publisher offers us on this occasion an excellent DVD in all respects: the film is offered in the respected 1.85 format, and the definition is exemplary, without the slightest problem of compression or other technical hiccups. On the sound side, the film is naturally offered in Dolby Digital 5.1, and benefits from a relatively dynamic ambient mix. It will also be noted that Blaq Out don’t forget the cinephiles who watch their films at home without using a sound spatialization system: the publisher also offers us a mix Dolby Digital 2.0 which will probably turn out to be more consistent if you view You only want me on a “simple” television.

On the side of the supplements section, the publisher first offers us a interview with Claire Simon and Swann Arnaud (15 minutes). The filmmaker will explain that he wanted to give a carnal aspect to a story that until now we only knew from the text, and the actor will be ecstatic about the result, a “real cinema proposal”. We will then continue with a interview with Claire Simon and Judith Fraggi (11 minutes), the 67-year-old filmmaker opening the discussion with the illustrator by returning to her conviction that the relationship between Yann Andréa and Marguerite Duras was very sexual. We will finally continue with a interview with Claire Simon and Céline Bozon (10 minutes), its director of photography. The two women will come back to their collaboration, their way of working together, as well as the particularities of the light of You only want me. Finally, we will end with a illustration gallery signed Judith Fraggi (1 minute), having the particularity of being presented in a rather singular way, which risks making more than one chuckle.

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